Tools and Application?

In class we are doing group presentations to show tools and ideas for assessment and how to use and adapt them. So far the presentations have been helpful and exciting, despite focusing on other subject areas. The groups have found interesting ways to incorporate assessment into their Units, and its exciting to see their ideas presented in a classroom scenario. These are a few of my favourite assessment tools that groups shared:

 SeeSaw App (http://web.seesaw.me/):

This is an interactive digital resource that allows students to post work and activities on a safe, secure, digital portfolio format. The group that shared this tool applied it to their Phys Ed unit plan, where students would use it to check-in and update their progress. This App also has features that mimic social media sights and allow for interaction between students. There is an option to invite parents to access their child’s work through the app so they can stay involved in their child’s progress. This would be an amazing tool for high school classes because parents are less often included in the classroom happenings. It would be fantastic to involve parents in the work going on and allow them to follow along through an app on their phone or device.

Question: I wonder how engaging the platform is for students. Is the app exciting enough that students will be motivated to add and update consistently? What if their progress slows or they can not see how they are improving?

Four Cornersblooms-taxonomy-owls-2

I have seen this tool in multiple situations and love the use of it for the Science presentation in class. This tool allows for a lot of flexibility, as teachers can adapt and change the questions and the prompts, and also the answers or ‘corners’ for the activity. Most commonly the prompts are broad ideas or statements, and the corners are agree, disagree, strongly agree, and strongly disagree. This set up allows for students to pick a side or response, then expects that they can discuss and explain their reasoning. This encourages dialectical thinking in class discussions, as students can see various points of view and perspectives. I like when this tool allows for discussion, rather than being used diagnostically for yes and no questions. Expecting students to understand and then defend their ideas and answers gives opportunity to reach higher levels of Bloom’s taxonomy.

Question: Is the Four Corners tool more effective for diagnostic or formative assessment? Can it be used summatively? Or more importantly, would it be an effective form of summative assessment?

3x Summary

This tool was presented as an English assessment tool, but could be effective in a Social Studies classroom as well. The task is to have students summarize a piece of writing in 10-15 words, then 30-50 words, and then 75-100 words. This requires students to figure out what they understand, then think deeper and be more descriptive as the summaries get longer. I think this is such a cool idea to get students thinking about their writing, as well as their understanding of a given topic or piece of writing.

In a Social class I think that the 3x summary would be good for reviewing topics already covered, to check for understanding once a topic is finished. This would also be a great tool to use in prepping for a larger writing piece such as a formal essay, which is a common formative assessment, but is also a large project for students first starting out. Having this summary of what they know would be a great way to break down an assignment that may seem overwhelming.

Question: I wonder if the 3x Summary could be useful in journaling activities, or more personal work like that? I also wonder how tools like this can be adapted to truly benefit EAL Students, or weak writers? It does break down the process, but if students do not have the vocabulary or understanding to stretch the summary to 100 words the task could be pointless.

I want to thank my class for their presentations last week. It was really interesting to see how assessment is done in areas like Phys Ed and Science, and exciting to see how my peers translate the class material into their own lessons and ideas.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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One thought on “Tools and Application?

  1. Nerdodactyl says:

    Hey Emily,
    I agree with you those were some pretty great strategies and all of the presentations were really great and it’s cool to see what goes on in other subjects from time to time. I’ve got a few cool graphics you might want to check out if you ever plan on bring tech into your classes.
    Like this one that pairs up different tech apps with different parts of Bloom’s Taxonomy and the SAMR model.

    http://www.teachthought.com/critical-thinking/blooms-taxonomy/the-padagogy-wheel/

    Question: I wonder how engaging the platform is for students. Is the app exciting enough that students will be motivated to add and update consistently? What if their progress slows or they can not see how they are improving?
    I touched on this a little bit in the start I think and if you follow the link I shared and read about the padagogy wheel it addresses some of these concerns of yours. I think the biggest thing when bringing tech into the class is looking as the SAMR model, Substitution, Augmentation, Modification, Redefinition. When you want to use a tool look at how that tool is going to interact with the learning task you are doing. Will the tool substitute something else? for example Google documents instead of paper. Will it augment what the task is? So substitution but with an improvement on functionality, the google document example can still apply because it improves the functionality with working on group projects and allows the teacher to check-in easily as well. Modification allows for you to redesign what the task at hand is, looking at bloom’s taxonomy it hits the Apply, Analyze, and Evaluate areas. Lastly we have Redefinition, does the tool redefine the task entirely? Hitting those higher levels of creation and metacognition when it comes to student thinking. At times students progress might slow but that could be to struggle which is good for their growth, they aren’t going to progress at a constant rate, they will have good days and bad days, the important part is that they keep moving forward and that you pick tools that let them see how they are progressing or that you as a teacher make an effort to show them and let them know they are progressing.

    Question: Is the Four Corners tool more effective for diagnostic or formative assessment? Can it be used summatively? Or more importantly, would it be an effective form of summative assessment?

    This is a good question and I think you have a good point, in my opinion the four corners activity is a good tool to use as assessment as learning and for learning, you can see where students are before a lesson and you can use it to gauge where they are during a lesson roughly. Using it as an assessment of learning can get tricky because there can be outside factors that affect students like following someone they think knows the right answer instead of thinking about it themselves, or just sticking with their friends. I don’t think it works very well as something to evaluate students on but you could make it into a fun engaging activity if you play to students competitive sides and make a last one standing type game out of it.

    Question: I wonder if the 3x Summary could be useful in journaling activities, or more personal work like that? I also wonder how tools like this can be adapted to truly benefit EAL Students, or weak writers? It does break down the process, but if students do not have the vocabulary or understanding to stretch the summary to 100 words the task could be pointless.

    These are some great point and it isn’t my area of expertise to address them effectively. I do think the 3x summary would be a great review tool in subjects like math and sciences to have student work on developing their understandings of concepts, a lot of the times they simply memorize how to carry out a process and don’t think about the importance behind what they are doing and why. While the 3x process might have some difficulties for weaker writers I think you could also do it orally and have students talk for a set about of time and then have them think about ways they could expand what they say and explain more. One think I wonder about the activity is how it could be used in reverse, have students take something and condense it having to filter it down to the key important words and phrases.

    The presentations were all really great and there were o many great assessment tools shared I almost wish we as a class could have had more than 15 minutes a group to talk about all the different things we were finding and thinking about different tools.

    Like

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